Moms and Wills - Laredo Law TorontoMany say that moms hold the family together. They love their kids unconditionally, often take them wherever they need to go and always, always know where everything is whenever someone needs it.

Being a mom is a lifelong job. And mothers give up a lot for it — sleep, peace and quiet, clean cars and relaxing weekends. They would even give up their lives if it meant protecting their children.

But have you thought about what it would mean for your family if you were gone? We know it’s not something most people want to think about, but if you don’t have a will, you are leaving behind a bigger problem than you may think.

If you have a spouse or common-law partner, it’s easy to assume that they will simply manage everything when you die. But he or she will be grieving and will need some direction. And what happens if your partner dies at the same time as you? Who will then manage your affairs?

It’s easy to believe that your kind and thoughtful family will sort out your affairs on your behalf. But without a will it’s just not that simple, no matter how much your family loves you.

Here’s why you need a will:

To make sure your kids get the care they deserve

If the other parent is in the picture, this one may be simple — they may continue raising your minor children. But if your situation is a little more complicated, or if you and their other parent die at the same moment, who will raise your children?  If it’s not written in a will, you lose out on the chance to decide. It doesn’t matter if your mother or sister or best friend promised to care for your kids if you ever died—if it’s not written in a will, a court may decide who will raise your kids.

To make sure your family has access to your assets

When you die, your assets are immediately frozen. Without a will, you have no executor, which means your loved ones won’t be able to access your money for their everyday cost of living in order to maintain their current lifestyle. It will all sit in limbo until the court appoints someone to be your executor. Your appointed executor may not be the same person you would choose (and will likely be your closest relative) so ask yourself, is this the person you would choose to manage your affairs?

To keep your family from fighting
Death without a will leaves your grieving family completely confused. No one will know where to start and your estate will sit in horrible chaos without an executor to take charge of your assets and start probate proceeding. Death in a family may not bring out the best of people in this worst of times.

Writing a will isn’t overly time-consuming. Dying without a will is for those you leave behind. More importantly, the cost of dying without one can be a lot more expensive compared to the cost of writing a will while you’re alive.

Now that writing a will is on your radar, it’s time to get it done. Get in touch today with your questions about creating your will.

This article does not replace legal advice and is meant to be for information purposes only. Please consult us or any other legally trained professional.